jMonkey | The Development Environment

The JME3 Development Environment The JME3 development environment is based on NetBeans. If you are familiar with this environment, then JME3 will be easy to pickup. If not, then you should not have much difficulty using JME3 as it is well organized. We will point out those features that you are most likely to encounter when developing your game. Figure 1 - JME3 SDK shows the initial JME3 window. In this section we will cover the basic components of the system and how to use them. As you progress through the book we will introduce other useful features including screen snapshots of important menu and dialog selections. Many features of the SDK are accessed using the file menu or access keys. The Project Window will display the relevant parts of a project such as its assets and files. We will learn more about this structure in this chapter. The Info Screen found in the middle of the SDK is replaced by your game’s file contents when developing the application. While console tab Output - Application is not used directly in a game, it is can be useful for debugging purposes. Figure 1 - JME3 SDK Once you have set up JME3 and understand its basics, you are ready to start the game development process. Important JME3 links to assist you in your development effort are listed in Table 1 - JME3 Useful Links.   Table 1 - JME3 Useful Links Topic URL Main JME3 Site http://hub.jmonkeyengine.org/tag/jme3/ Downloads http://hub.jmonkeyengine.org/downloads/ Current status…

jMonkey – Game Logic and Application States

Understanding Application States The Appstate interface is found in the com.jme3.app.state package. It allows us to control the logic of the game on a global scale. Application states are used to handle a wide variety of different situations and to simplify the simpleUpdate method. Let’s look at a few different examples of how application states are used. We can do this by moving code from simpleUpdate to an AppState object’s update method. An AppState class is an extension of your application. AppStates have access to every field in your application. Each AppState calls an initialize and cleanup method when added and removed from the game, respectively. It also has its own update method that connects to simpleUpdate. You can specify exactly what happens when an AppState is paused and resumed. You can also use one AppState to switch between other sets of AppStates. Once an application state is attached to a game, every time the simpleUpdate method executes, the application state’s update method is executed. This permits moving game logic to the appropriate method. There are 5 steps to follow when creating and using an AppState: Create a new class extending AbstractAppState Implement its abstract methods Add game behaviour to the AppState’s update method Attach the AppState to the AppStateManager Detach the AppState when you are done with it Creating an AppState Object To illustrate this process, we will demonstrate an AppState that will create and add a rotating effect to the planetary system we created in Chapter 2. To…

Java Exceptions Assertions Logging Book

Java Logging

Configuring Java Logging You can configure java logging in three different ways: Use a configuration properties file Configure logging by providing a class Setup your own logging configuration   Using a Configuration File The configuration file for the logging system is located, by default, in the jre/lib directory, and is named as logging.properties. Note that this is the default logging configuration file, and you can specify an alternative filename with the java.util.logging.config.file system property, as shown here:   java –Djava.util.logging.config.file=/temp/log.properties   The logging.properties file defines the loggers, handlers, filters and formatters you want to use in your logging. Here is a quick summary of how the logging configuration file is organized:   Global Properties Global properties, of course, apply to all loggers and handlers. A key global property is the default global logging level, which specifies the events the logging system will log for all loggers. You can override this global level with a specific logging level. You can change the default global logging level by changing the value of the default logging level, which is set to INFO, as shown here:   .level = INFO   Handler Specific Properties This section specifies the configuration of individual handlers. Here is what you will see by default:   #default file output is in user's home directory. java.util.logging.FileHandler.pattern = %h/java%u.log java.util.logging.FileHandler.limit = 50000 java.util.logging.FileHandler.count = 1 java.util.logging.FileHandler.formatter = java.util.logging.XMLFormatter   # Limit the messages that are printed on the console to INFO and above. java.util.logging.ConsoleHandler.level = INFO java.util.logging.FileHandler.level = ALL   java.util.logging.ConsoleHandler.formatter…

Oracle FDMEE

Oracle FDMEE Training – Log Analysis

Process Logs The FDMEE process log is the first step to troubleshooting a failed process. The process log captures, in a text-based file, information about an execution of application functionality. The process log can contain an extraordinary amount of information. As highlighted in Chapter 1, the level of detail contained in the process log is determined by the Log Level setting at the System, Application or User Setting. Log level 5 is the most verbose and will result in the process log containing the greatest level of information. The process logs can be accessed from the Workflow tab by clicking on Process Details. Each execution in the application for which a process ID is generated is displayed. The Show hyperlink in the Log column allows the process log for a given Process ID to be downloaded locally. This is extremely valuable since not all users, including administrators, will always have access to the FDMEE network share directory where the process log is generated and saved. The process logs are stored in the Logs directory of the application Outbox. Figure 9-1: Process Details The below image displays the process details. Clicking on the Show text in the Log column for a given process ID allows the log file to be downloaded for viewing. A unique process ID, and therefore process log, is generated for each execution of the workflow, batches, custom scripts, reports, initializing of a source system and purging of application elements. Importantly, there is no process ID associated with…

Oracle Siebel Open UI Developer's Handbook

Oracle Siebel Open UI Developer’s Handbook | Creating a Custom Utility Library

Every seasoned programmer can relate to the need to keep a library of often-used functions. Using such utility libraries is established and highly recommended practice and we should revert to this technique in Siebel Open UI development as well. In the following case study, we will use a public Open UI library that has been created for educational purposes to convey the steps to create a custom utility library. This library is called siebelhub.js and has been published by the Siebel Hub team. You can find the source code and links to documentation on https://github.com/siebelhub/siebelhub.js. The following list outlines the steps needed to create a custom utility library in Siebel Open UI. Create a dedicated JavaScript file Register the file in the Manifest Call library functions In the following sections, we will describe each step in detail, using siebelhub.js as an example. Creating a Dedicated JavaScript File We would typically start with an empty file and save it to the siebel/custom folder as usual, using a meaningful name such as utilities.js. As a task, this is simple enough. If you want to explore the siebelhub.js library, you can download the full archive from https://github.com/siebelhub/siebelhub.js and extract the siebelhub.js file from the archive into the siebel/custom folder. In addition, extract the siebelhub.css file and copy its content to a custom style sheet of your choice. If you want to explore the full functionality of siebelhub.js, refer to the documentation links which include installation notes and which explain how to add the…

Oracle Siebel Open UI Developer's Handbook

Oracle Siebel Open UI CRM – Example Code Files

Taken from Appendix B of The Oracle Siebel Open UI Developer’s Handbook [2016 Edition] Working with Example Code Files The book contains case study examples that are complemented by code archives. In this appendix, we will briefly review the techniques for importing code files into your self-study environment. The following will be covered: Copy example JavaScript files Copy example style sheets Copy example image files Copy example web templates Import Siebel Tools archive files Copying Example JavaScript Files Most of the code archives contain example JavaScript files that implement custom presentation models or custom physical renderers. To implement the case study, extract the code archive for the chapter and copy the JavaScript files mentioned in the case study to the following folder in your Siebel Developer Web Client installation. For IP 2015 or earlier, follow this path: <Client Installation Folder>\PUBLIC\<Language>\<Build>\SCRIPTS\siebel\custom   Depending on your installation, the Build version, and language pack(s), the path on your machine might be different. For IP 2016 or higher, use this path: <Client Installation Folder>\PUBLIC\SCRIPTS\siebel\custom   After copying the files to the correct location, follow the instructions in the case study to complete the example scenario. Copying Example Style Sheets The following is an example of the correct location of example style sheets for IP 2015 or earlier: D:\Siebel\Client\PUBLIC\enu\FILES\custom   For IP 2016 or higher, use: D:\Siebel\Client\PUBLIC\FILES\custom   Custom style sheets must always be located in the custom sub-folder of the FILES directory. If the code archive contains .css files, copy them to the folder location…

Getting Started with Oracle Service Cloud [OSvC]

Answers to Oracle Service Cloud Questions | Sample Exam Training

From time to time in your career as an Oracle Service Cloud user, consultant or administrator, you will be called upon to demonstrate your knowledge. This might be in the form of an assessment, an interview or some sort of examination either at corporate or a higher level. The book Getting Started with Oracle Service Cloud ends with more than 50 exam-style questions. Here are the answers. Oracle Service Cloud Exam-Style Answers 1. By merging two Workspaces 2. Have no Workspace selected for that object 3. Use multiple Tabs to provide different approaches such as guided assistance; Add shortcut keys; Test the Workspace in the target resolution of your users 4. A Workflow 5. A Script 6. TRUE 7. The same profile as the user editing the Workspace 8. New Record; Open Existing Record 9. Select the Field in the Designer, and select Required > Profile Based > Select the Profile > Select On New from the Ribbon 10. The Custom Workspace is not based on the Asset Object; The Banner Flag can be hidden using the Workspace Ribbon 11. Set the Tab as Hidden on New in the Workspace in the Design Tab of the Ribbon 12. When it is clicked 13. In the Navigation Set Explorer, select the Quick Search checkbox, then add any search Reports from the Public Reports folder into the Quick Search by dragging it onto the lower portion of the right column 14. The Explorer lets you delete the Navigation Set but you must update…

Writing a Technology Book

How to Publish Your Technology Book

P8tech is one of the world’s most forward thinking technology book publishers out there. The world of tech moves at breakneck speed, and we pride ourselves on trying to keep pace. We publish books across the technology space although we have historically focused on Java-related and Oracle Enterprise topics. If you are interested in writing and being published, there are a number of things to be aware of. Market size Publishers, like ourselves, try to determine the market size for any book before commissioning it. Market size is normally a small subset of the headline numbers that get bandied around. I.e., if 1 million people are interested in technology X, a book could potentially convert 1-2% of that population into buyers of your book. Things that affect market size and sales Existing books (e., the amount of competition) The direction of travel for the technology (growing, declining, about to be deprecated!) What the book really accomplishes (see below) Up-to-dateness How focused the book is (200 pages of filler, and 100 pages of usefulness…) Author following (If 9 million people follow you on Twitter, or you have a well-regarded blog, that’s a good sign for the book) The technology is really new; the numbers for its popularity are probably weak Fair enough but (and without contradicting the above) all tech started somewhere. Why not take a punt and make a pitch? An editor will be able to help you ascertain the size of the market and whether a book is viable.…

Where Data is Wealth - J Bruce Daley

Data is Wealth | J Bruce Daley

Data is Wealth It’s all numbers, the croupier thought. Spin of the wheel, turn of the card, time of your life, date of your birth, year of your death. In the book of Numbers the Lord said, “Thou shall count thy steps”. Paul Mayersberg Thanks to the internet of things (IoT), toasters will soon be collecting data about your toasting habits. The data from your toaster may never be analyzed, or it may be used to estimate future demand for toasters, or fed into a deep learning system to plan the planting of next year’s wheat crop, or used to help design the next generation of toasters. Data from your toaster could even provide you with an alibi if your unique toasting habits can prove you could not possibly have been at the scene of the crime. Sounds farfetched? According to Marc Goodman, smart electric meter data is being analyzed to measure fluctuations in energy usage to determine which television programs are being shown in a household at any given time. Depending on how it is applied, the value of the data that toasters will produce could be greater than value of the toast or the device itself. As Tom Goodwin points out on TechCrunch11: - Uber, the world’s largest taxi company, owns no vehicles. - Facebook, the world’s most popular media owner, creates no content. - Alibaba, the most valuable retailer, has no inventory. - Airbnb, the world’s largest accommodation provider, owns no real estate. [11 The Battle Is…

Oracle Policy Automation Book

What is Oracle Policy Automation?

What is Oracle Policy Automation? Oracle Policy Automation is the name given to a family of applications concerned with the design, development and deployment of business rules. The solution aims to decrease the time it takes to write rules, as well as the effort it takes to update and deploy them. At the time of writing, in December 2016, Oracle Policy Automation is available in the following versions. Oracle Policy Automation version 12 This is the latest major version of OPA. It offers essentially the same modelling interface for both public cloud and private cloud customers. OPA version 12 also provides the Policy Automation Hub application for visual management of the repository, external data source connections, deployments and Project collaboration. This version is the subject of this book. The product is available in Public and Private Cloud. You will discover both in this book. The Private Cloud version is currently v12.2.5.644. Oracle Policy Automation version 10.4.x Version 10.4.x includes a Windows-based modelling tool and is offered with a number of application-specific connectors (Siebel Connector, Connector for Oracle CRM On Demand, SAP Connector for Java). The majority of the examples of how to write rules will also work with this version. The latest version available is  10.4.7 (10.4 Update 7). Oracle Policy Modeling Ultimately, whatever OPA version you are working with, the modelling interface is the primary point of contact for most consultants. In both guises it is Windows-based and provides the visual framework for the conception and delivery of rules,…